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Dry January Peer-to-Peer Campaign

In Support of: Inclusion Advocacy SENB

Dry January Peer-to-Peer Campaign

In Support of: Inclusion Advocacy SENB

Campaign CTA Media Photo

Go alcohol-free in January to raise funds for people who have an intellectual, developmental disability

$0.00 raised of
$20,000.00 goal
0 donors
5 days left
When
12:00 AM AST to 11:59 PM AST
Where

Dry January Peer-to-Peer Campaign

In Support of: Inclusion Advocacy SENB

Campaign CTA Media Photo

Go alcohol-free in January to raise funds for people who have an intellectual, developmental disability

$0.00 raised of
$20,000.00 goal
0 donors
5 days left
When
12:00 AM AST to 11:59 PM AST
Where

Dry January Peer to Peer Campaign

Dry January is a fundraiser that encourages you to go alcohol-free in January to raise funds for people who have an intellectual or developmental disability (some of the most vulnerable and at risk members of our communities who can be significantly impacted by alcohol in many different ways)!

 

The funds you raise as part of your Dry January for Inclusion Advocacy SENB will provide invaluable services and supports that enable individuals to live, learn, work, and participate with dignity as respected, valued and contributing members of their community.

 

The far-reaching effects of alcohol on health, social, psychological, economic, and work safety outcomes are well-documented. Having a month off alcohol also has great health benefits, such as sleeping better, having more energy and of course, no hangovers! So you're not only helping others, you're helping yourself. It's a win-win!

 

1.      REGISTER for the challenge and choose 31, 21 or 14 days dry

2.      Go alcohol-free in January

3.      Ask family, friends and workmates to sponsor you

4.      Help youth and adults who have an intellectual, developmental disability.


If you are looking for someone else's Dry January campaign to donate to, scroll down to the leaderboard.


You will receive a tax receipt from Inclusion Advocacy SENB for your donation by email. For more information on Inclusion Advocacy SENB, go to https://www.inclusionadvocacy.ca/

Why Dry January

A new study published in the Canadian Journal of Public Health has found that there is a strong correlation between exposure to mass traumatic events and increased alcohol consumption and related harms both in the short term and for one to two years after a crisis. This finding is concerning as Canadians report an increase in alcohol consumption since the pandemic began.

 

A previous study conducted in April 2020 by the Canadian Centre on Substance Use and Addiction found 25% of Canadians between the ages of 35 and 54 reported an increase in the amount of alcohol they consumed during lockdown and stay-at-home orders.


These numbers are even more concerning to the communities of vulnerable individuals, including some with intellectual or developmental disabilities, like fetal alcohol spectrum disorder, due to an increase in alcoholism as a coping mechanism.


It is however important to be aware that not all intellectual and or developmental disabilities (IDD) are related to alcohol consumption and responsible, moderate alcohol consumption, for some individuals, with IDD, is no more or less acceptable than it is for the general population.

 

The far-reaching effects of alcohol on health, social, psychological, economic, and work safety outcomes is well-documented. Having a month off alcohol also has great health benefits, such as sleeping better, having more energy and of course, no hangovers! So you're not only helping others, you're helping yourself. It's a win-win!

 

Important Note

Dry January is a fundraising campaign aimed at challenging social drinkers to change their habits for a month and make some healthy lifestyle changes. We would also encourage people to drink responsibly and stick to the recommended daily guidelines for the rest of the year. We advise heavy drinkers or people dependent on alcohol to speak with their health care provider before signing up to Dry January.

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Register & start collecting pledges

Leaderboard
1
Dry January Campaign - Hélène & Jesse Kerpan's logo
Dry January Campaign - Hélène & Jesse Kerpan
$646.00
/$750.00
2
Dry January Peer-to-Peer Campaign - CA Melanson-Savoy's logo
Dry January Peer-to-Peer Campaign - CA Melanson-Savoy
$502.00
/$500.00
3
Dry January Peer-to-Peer Campaign - Amber Richards's logo
Dry January Peer-to-Peer Campaign - Amber Richards
$162.00
/$500.00
4
Dry January Peer-to-Peer Campaign - Catherine Molloy 's logo
Dry January Peer-to-Peer Campaign - Catherine Molloy
$125.00
/$300.00
5
Dry January Peer-to-Peer Campaign - David  Maynard Maynard's logo
Dry January Peer-to-Peer Campaign - David Maynard Maynard
$86.00
/$500.00

Top 3 Fundraising Tips

1. Show You're Committed - Donate to Yourself

Nothing shows commitment to the cause and challenge like donating to yourself. It's also a great way to lead by example - if you're asking friends and family to make a donation, it makes sense to donate to yourself as well! Calculate how much money you're saving by going dry in January and start there. Plus, people who donate to themselves raise twice as much as people who don't.


2. Spread the Word

Let friends, family and colleagues know you've signed up to the challenge - that way, there's no backing out! Tell them in person (maybe that's a video call now!), send an email, send an text, put it on Facebook, Tweet it, Snapchat it; whatever works for you (maybe all of them)! Don't forget to let them know how they can support you and make a donation: share your profile page URL, or ask them to find your name on the Leaderboard.


3. It's OK to ask more than once

We all need reminding every now and again. You're doing something great for yourself, and for others, so don't hesitate to follow up with people, and remind them to make a donation. Even if you've asked before, people get busy or simply forget.

An easy way to remind people is by posting updates throughout the month. Don't forget to explain why you're taking part and why Dry January is important to you. Let friends and family know that their donation will not only motivate you to stay dry, but it's going to a great cause; helping people with intellectual and developmental disabilities.


Need help? Send Amber an email at amber@ambereffect.com to request our Fundraising Resources to help you raise funds.


Our Annual Impact

300+

individuals from birth to seniors, and their families served in South East New Brunswick

334

direct advocacy consultations held in 2019

349

meetings conducted toward securing funds through grants and community fundraising efforts in 2019

450

hours of adult literacy instruction in 2019

From those we serve:

"My name is Dorothy this is how Inclusion Advocacy has helped me, by writing a letter to my social worker to tell her I have been coming to class for 7 years and helping me contact N.B. Housing I attend adult learning classes, I have improved my reading, spelling writing math skills. I have learned to use computers. Classes get me out of the house and give me a chance to socialize and make new friends and gives us a chance to help each other. I am proud that I live alone with no supports. I am starting to talk to people when there is something bothering me."


"Our child has had minimal contact outside of our home since graduating high school over 5 years ago. Until we found IA SENB. He now attends school and actual sessions there, where he has real conversations with his peers while at the same time broadening his horizons and learning new things. IA SENB has so much to offer him that we as parents alone cannot. We now look towards the future with hope and are encouraged that he may well achieve his dream of having an apartment, a job and a support dog."


"Living with a disability is challenging, but I like to use it as a teaching tool for others. I was born with Cerebral Palsy and I use an electric chair as my legs and feet to get me to where I’m going. Having a disability wasn’t my choice, however, I do choose to help people understand that we are the same as everyone else. We may do things differently, but at the end of the day we get the job done.

I grew up with two siblings that didn’t have disabilities and my family taught and treated me like I was no different than anybody else. I was told by the education system I would never graduate high school let alone go to college. When people doubt my abilities it only makes me more determined to be successful and prove them wrong. Not only did I complete high school, I also graduated from college and have a successful career. People never thought I’d be able to live on my own, but here I am. I have supports that come in to help me with the basic needs that most people take for granted such as, showering, dressing, using the bathroom, and preparing meals. I am just like you; I want all the same things, including my independence. I just need a little help along the way. That doesn’t mean you have to pity me; let’s face it, I don’t know anything different.

Disabilities vary from person to person, some are invisible and some visible and stick out like a sore thumb! It’s hard for a lot of people to get past my chair and see me as a person, especially when it comes to employment opportunities. I became tired of people not taking me seriously. Many potential employers see a disability and are afraid it will create more work for them and simply look the other way. Also, most buildings aren’t actually accessible so I had to take matters into my own hands and started a small business of my own.

Life is hard enough when you don’t have a disability, but it’s even more challenging when you do. We have to prove to people what we are capable of and that’s why I became a vocal part of the community and sit on committees and boards. The public needs to know what people with disabilities can bring to the table.

I didn’t get to where I am today because I sat back and had it handed to me. I am where am because I fought for everything I have. I also had the support of my family and Inclusion Advocacy when things got really tough. I can honestly say I look forward to the day when people don’t see the disability, but rather the ability of the person. One day you may be in the same position so take a chance on someone with a disability, you may be surprised at what we have to offer."      (Kourtney)

Contact Us

Amber Richards

Amber Richards

Event Manager

Connie Melanson-Savoy

Connie Melanson-Savoy

Executive Director

Organized by
Inclusion Advocacy SENB
Inclusion Advocacy is a local non-profit, registered charity, dedicated to protecting the rights and promoting the interests of individuals with intellectual disability and developmental disabilities, and their families in South East New Brunswick. . We are an association working with partners to build community and to enhance the lives of children, youth and, adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities, and their families by supporting abilities, promoting action and advancing rights, responsibilities and social justice.
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