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HAMEC 2023 | Gala Dinner and Auction

By: Holocaust Awareness Museum and Education Center

HAMEC 2023 | Gala Dinner and Auction

By: Holocaust Awareness Museum and Education Center

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When
November 18, 2023 6:00 PM EST to 10:00 PM EST
Where
Radisson Hotel-2400 Old Lincoln Highway, Philadelphia, PA  19053

HAMEC 2023 | Gala Dinner and Auction

Dear Friend and Supporter,


The Holocaust Awareness Museum and Education (HAMEC) has been on the front lines of combating Antisemitism and all hatred for 62 years.  Our mission is to educate young people about the consequences of hate.  How? By sending Survivors into the classrooms in person and virtually.  In the last 13 years our Heroes have spoken to well over 350,000 students in Middle Schools, High Schools, and Colleges--Public--Private and Parochial Schools.  

   

Have they been successful?  YES!  Over 200,000 of the total students reached by HAMEC were in Pennsylvania.  A recent comprehensive study by the Conference on Material Claims Against Germany showed that Pennsylvania millennials ranked 5th out of 50 States in Holocaust knowledge.  That is not an accident.   

 

While tragically we continue to lose some of our Heroic Survivors every year.  But we cannot and will not abandon their mission!  We have and will continue to recruit additional Survivors and their children and grandchildren to tell these important stories.  

   

This year's Dinner Honoree is a perfect example.  Dr. Dina Lichtman Smith joined our team as a volunteer driver and facilitator over 3 years ago.  As a child of Survivors Dina was born in Bergen-Belsen after the War and has been and will continue to tell her family's amazing story to as many young people as she can.  


Chuck Feldman

President, Holocaust Awareness Museum and Education Center

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HAMEC Honoree

Dr. Dina Lichtman Smith PhD

Dr. Dina Lichtman Smith was born in Bergen Belsen Displaced Persons camp in 1948. Her parents were Polish Jews who survivor the horrors of the Nazi’s plan to terminate all Jews. They both were prisoners at Auschwitz and met in the Displaced Persons Camp after the war. As a child refugee, Dina was influenced by her parents’ determination and courage to find a better life in the United States. She came to the US in 1949 when she was only 18 months old.  

 

Dina and her family were poor refugees, immigrants with thick accents who came to the USA for a better life. They settled in a part of North Philadelphia where other Holocaust survivors lived. From there, they moved to a housing project where they always stood out due to their Jewishness.  

 

Despite her impoverished childhood, Dina went on to earn her undergraduate and doctoral degrees from Temple University.  She is now the CEO of DLS Coaching. Dina is a nationally recognized and widely published executive coach having worked with national leaders and CEOs of Fortune 100 companies, scientists, physicians, financial executives, and leaders who need to quickly assimilate into a new corporate culture.  Through hope, hard work, and determination, she and her family succeeded in reaching their goals.  

 

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Witness to History Project Future Leaders Honoree

Jeffrey Himelstein

I grew up in Media, Pennsylvania with my two siblings and parents. I attended Haverford College where I majored in psychology. I am currently studying for my doctorate in clinical psychology at Chestnut Hill College. Outside work and school, I like to play tennis and pickleball, play guitar and violin, participate in the Witness to History Project, sail, and spend time with family and friends.  

 

Since 2010, I have been participating in the Witness to History Project, which involves interviewing Holocaust survivors and presenting their testimonies to as many people as possible so that history does not repeat itself. I have interviewed and presented the testimonies of three Holocaust survivors. The Witness to History Project has been a life changing experience. I am so grateful that I have had the chance to meet and get to know these courageous, resilient, kind, and wonderful Holocaust survivors. They are my heroes, and I will continue to be their voices for the rest of my life.  

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Witness to History Project Future Leaders Honoree

Robyn Himelstein

I am from Media, Pennsylvania. I graduated from Haverford College, where I majored in psychology and played on the tennis team. I am now a clinical psychology doctoral student at Rowan University. At Rowan, I am part of the Social, Emotional, and Affective Health Lab, which focuses on improving emotional health in neurodivergent populations. As part of my experiences as a student, this past year I have also been an extern at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia Autism Integrated Care program and Gender & Sexuality Development Program. My ultimate goal when I become a clinical psychologist is to help individuals on the autism spectrum and individuals from diverse gender identities. In my spare time, I enjoy playing tennis and pickleball, and spending time with my family, friends, and golden retriever, Louie.



I have been participating in the Witness to History Project since 2010. It was through this project that I met and became friends with two of the most kind, courageous, and strong gentlemen, Michael Herskovitz and Kurt Herman. Words cannot describe how much I miss my two heroes. It is my honor to continue to be their voice. I miss their humor. I smile when I remember Michael making everyone laugh when he said, “I didn’t have an accent until I came to America.” I miss their wisdom. I remember Kurt saying “hatred is poison,” which continues to be ever so true in today’s world. I will never forget one of my presentations to a group of teenagers in a detention center. The teens were shocked to hear that Michael feels no animosity nor holds the descendants of the Nazis responsible for the Holocaust.A powerful moment that brought tears to the eyes of the detention center staff and us occurred at the end of the event when the teenagers spontaneously formed a line to shake Michael’s hand. One boy hugged him and said, "Thanks to you, I will learn to forgive."

Virtual Auction

Frequently Asked Questions

How do I join the auction? 

When the auction opens at sundown on November 4th, you will be able to join from this page. 

Are the items in the virtual auction, the same as the ones in the silent auction?

No, silent auction items are different from the virtual auction items. They are all unique packages waiting to be yours.

How do I bid on an item? 

To bid on an item, click the “view and bid” button. If this is the first time you are bidding on an item in this auction you will be prompted to enter your email address and create a password to login to the auction. You will also be required to add in your credit card details to place a bid. Once logged in, you can bid on as many items as you wish! 

How do I bid anonymously?

Bidding anonymously is easy! Sign up or log in to create your account. Once logged in, click on your name in the top right corner. Select My Account and look for the checkbox to Bid Anonymously. 

When do I pay for the item I won? 

It's done automatically! When the auction closes your credit card will be charged for any won items, based on the card details you shared before you placed your first bid. You'll be notified of this charge to your account by email and text notifications. 

How will I know if I’ve been outbid? 

When you are outbid on an item, you will receive an email letting you know you’ve been outbid. You also have the option to enable text notifications for quick updates or browser notifications. 

How will I know if I’ve won?

When the auction is closed, everyone will receive an email notifying them if they won items or not. 

How will I know when the auction starts and ends? 

If you sign into the auction before it begins, you will receive an email when the auction begins and another email when the auction closes. 

What happens if two people bid the same amount with automated bidding?

The first person to set up their bids with automated bidding will win the item when the auction closes. We'd encourage you to set up automated bidding early so you have the best chances of winning! 

Our Yearly Impact
Over 300,000

students reached in the last 10 years 

Over 30

countries on 6 continents reached with testimony programs 

Over 800

artifacts preserved 

Over 41,000

Participants in Education Programs this year 

Organized by
Holocaust Awareness Museum and Education Center
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